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From Gems & Jewellery:

Click here for the article.

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From Secondhand and Vintage London:

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From Japanese Vogue :

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From the Financial Times

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From 'Gem and Jewellery News', the Gemmological Association of Great Britian and the Society of Jewellery Historians:
Pleasant book enlightening an area that has been little illuminated in the past few years. The materials described are arranged in rather a jolly way, first by myths and then by materials. Before getting this far we have been introduced to cameo carving and to cameo as an art form in general. Each item illustrated (very well) carries a caption giving size, provenance and a next-door text outlining the fable illustrated. There is a useful bibliography and a brief note on purchasing cameos. I found this fun to read, with some memories of a classical education reaching the surface. This is good value for the price.


Michael O'Donoghue

 

 

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From Travel and Leisure :


Best of London shopping. Looking for the old guard or the avant-garde? From Knightsbride to Notting Hill, Lynn Yeager reveals 52 essential addresses for your next buying trip...


On weekdays, more than 100 dealers at Grays Antique Markets (58 Davies St.; +44 207 629 7034) and the adjacent Greys-in-the-Mews offer a spectacular array of antique jewelry... Michele Rowan (Booth 315; +44 207 629 7234) accommodates both tourists looking to spend under $100 and the deep-pocketed connoisseurs of old English jewelry. Some pieces here date back to the 17th century. Love cameos? Rowan has some of the rarest in the city.

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From UK Newspaper 'The Independent', 'The Best Fifty Vintage Shops'


Martin recommends Rowan & Rowan because "they sell a fantastic selection of unusual jewellery that often has a story." Seventeenth, 18th and 19th-century pieces include secret compartment and mourning jewellery such as rings, brooches and pendants - where lovers or mourners secreted locks of their loved one's hair, scarce antique paste and enamel and from the 20th-century, Edwardian moonstones and rare Suffragrette objects. Michele Rowan is an antique jewellery expert, most notably in cameos, in which the business specialises.

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From the BBC's 'Home And Antiques' magazine, feature on objects of desire - sentimental jewellery.

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From the UK 'Antiques Magazine':

Rowan's book on this most intricate of jewels is a practical guide to the symbolism of their mythological subjects, and why they found an audience in Regency society, and, later with the Victorians. As a child, looking at my grandmother's relief-carved treasures, they seemed to me like miniature sculptures, like Roman statuary. Indeed, it is for that reason that they were the ideal medium in which to revive classical themes, responding to the Neo-classical trends of the early century, the collecting of cameos indicating a certain elegance and refinement of a person in a late Georgian culture obsessed with poise, social standing and etiquette. It is little surprise then, that they favoured cameos which represented the themes which had captivated their classical forebears - mythology. Dividing her book into sections looking at for example, the use of Aphrodite and Eros in love cameos, cosmological myths, such as the sun god Helios and rainbow goddess Iris, and land figures such as Pan, Dionysus and the centaurs, Rowan narrates the stories displayed on these translucent backgrounds.The Grand Tour of Europe, but mainly Rome, Venice, Athens was still the educated Victorian's choice of adventure, and the art of the ancient gem-engravers from these regions was emulated in their modern incarnations' careful selection of stone; utilising striations or layers to bring forward a texture or add colour. However, the Victorians were less concerned with mythological accuracy, reinterpreting the deities through their sentimentality and romanticism and losing a certain purity of the earlier jewel. With detailed captions accompanying the many colour illustrations, Rowan's discussion of the superb craftsmanship involved in producing a cameo, her revelations as to the figures represented thereon, will change your mind about a piece of jewellery often considered the domain of dowagers and grandmothers.